Cdc adolescent dating violence

The 2009 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey revealed that 9.8% of high school students report being hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend in the 12 months prior to the survey.The 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, revealed even more alarming statistics: About 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men who ever experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age.Note that some youth also experience reproductive coercion: abusive behaviors by male partners intended to promote pregnancy in a dating partner in a Massachusetts study were four to six times more likely than their non-abused peers to have been pregnant and eight to nine times more likely to have attempted suicide in the past year.Healthy relationships, particularly in the context of dating or sexual activity, play an important role in increasing the use of contraception and preventing teen pregnancy.Although the dynamics of TDV are similar to adult domestic violence, the forms and experience of TDV as well as the challenges in seeking and providing services make the problem of TDV unique.TDV occurs in different forms, including verbal, emotional, physical, sexual, and digital, and the experience of TDV may have both immediate and long term effects on young people.The purpose of this study was to provide high‐quality scientific evidence concerning the effectiveness of targeting a young, universal primary prevention audience with classroom‐based curricula and school‐level interventions.The reported incidence of teen dating violence varies significantly across studies, yet even with variation the known prevalence rates establish it as a serious problem in the United States.

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The fact sheet also presents data that suggests the association between forced sexual intercourse and risky behaviors.

Research has shown a strong connection between teen dating violence and poor health outcomes.

For example, teens who are victims of physical dating violence are more likely than their non-abused peers to smoke, use drugs, engage in unhealthy diet behaviors (taking diet pills or laxatives and vomiting to lose weight), engage in risky sexual behaviors, and attempt or consider suicide.

The fact sheet also presents CDC's approach to teen dating violence prevention.

This document examines the prevalence of dating violence by gender and communities of color.

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